australia energy

atlassian’s mike cannon-brookes says the australian tech company will become 100% renewable by 2025

Coalition ‘tying themselves in knots’ on electric vehicles, Mike Cannon-Brookes says

Mike Cannon-Brookes says the Coalition has tied itself in knots over Labor’s electric vehicles policy and that the 50% target for electric vehicle sales by 2030 is “very achievable” and not ambitious.

bill shorten charges an electric car after launching labor’s climate change policy in canberra

Labor’s climate change policy explained: here’s what we know

Just days before the federal election is called, Labor has released the final component of its climate change policy. Scott Morrison has promptly declared it is carbon tax 2.0 and the regulations will impose massive costs on Australians.

australian greens leader richard di natale (left) with climate spokesman adam bandt

Greens blast key part of Labor’s climate policy as ‘fake action’

The Greens are positioning to torpedo a key element of Labor’s new climate policy in the event Bill Shorten wins the federal election in May, telegraphing strong opposition to heavy polluters using international permits to meet their emissions reduction targets.

bill shorten says climate change is doing real damage to the environment and the economy

50% of new cars to be electric vehicles by 2030 under Labor climate change policy

Labor will set a national electric vehicles target of 50% new car sales by 2030, and 50% for the government fleet by 2025, as well as allowing business to deduct a 20% depreciation for private fleet EVs valued at more than $20,000, as part of its climate change policy to be unveiled on Monday.

the shipment of electric cars arrives in australia in 2010

‘Woefully dirty’: government accused over Australia’s failure to cut vehicle emissions

The office of the transport minister, Michael McCormack, said the government had not made a decision on “how or when” standards to cut carbon pollution from vehicles might be implemented.

industries producing high levels of carbon emissions, including the cement, steel and aluminium sectors, will have more stringent requirements

Labor to tighten emissions regime as it draws climate battle-lines

Labor is set to unveil a climate policy that will beef up the Morrison government’s heavily criticised safeguard mechanism, creating new pollution reduction requirements for the aviation sector, cement, steel and aluminum, mining and gas, direct combustion and the non-electricity energy sectors.

the greens’ new climate and energy policy lays down markers for the bartering that could play out after the federal election

Greens set 2030 cut-off for coal exports and coal-fired power stations

The Greens will propose 2030 as the cut-off point for thermal coal exports, and the shutdown date for Australia’s fleet of coal-fired power stations, in the party’s new climate and energy policy heading into the federal election.

the companies reported to be ignoring the paris climate deal are worth a combined $121bn and represent 7% of the asx300 index

‘Out of line’: top Australian companies accused of undermining Paris deal

New analysis shows 22 of Australia’s largest companies are actively working to undermine the Paris agreement targets, betting shareholders’ money on strategies that assume global climate change action fails.

bill shorten is set to unveil labor’s climate change policy over the coming weeks

Labor edges away from using Kyoto credits to reach Paris target

In his strongest comments to date, the Labor leader said over the weekend he recognised that other countries had resolved not to use the accounting system that allows countries to count credits from exceeding their targets under the soon-to-be-obsolete Kyoto protocol periods against their Paris emissions reduction commitments for 2030.

modelling by baeconomics has found lifting australia’s emissions reduction target

Climate modelling cited by Angus Taylor did not model Labor policy

The modelling states that it “does not attempt to estimate the possible economic consequences linked to climate change itself”, implicitly ignoring the benefits to Australia of mitigating climate change through stricter targets.

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