oceans

danny faure (left) was speaking from a manned submersible off the coast of the island nation

Seychelles president issues underwater plea to protect oceans

The president of the Seychelles has made a plea for stronger protection of the “beating blue heart of our planet”, in a speech delivered from deep below the ocean’s surface. Danny Faure’s call for action, billed as the first live speech from a submersible, came during a visit to an ambitious British-led science expedition exploring the Indian Ocean depths.

gentoo penguins in the antarctic

Campaign to save oceans maps out global network of sanctuaries

The study, ahead of a historic vote at the UN, sets out the first detailed plan of how countries can protect over a third of the world’s oceans by 2030, a target scientists and policy makers say is crucial in order to safeguard marine ecosystems and help mitigate the impacts of a rapidly heating world.

fish swim in the blue waters off indonesia

House Hearing Stresses Climate Change’s Links to Ocean Health

Backed by new Democratic congressional leadership determined to focus on science, experts call for swift action to avoid or limit irreparable environmental harm — “You can’t have a serious conversation about the health of our oceans and coastal communities without acknowledging the growing impacts of climate change,” Rep. Jared Huffman (D-Calif.) said at the outset …

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dust storms from the sahara

A Novel Approach Reveals Element Cycles in the Ocean

Dissolved thorium isotopes light the way to a more thorough understanding of how different elements enter marine environments—and how long they stay there — The ocean covers 72% of Earth’s surface and plays a vital role in global biogeochemical cycles. The carbon and nitrogen cycles receive ample attention because of their impact on the climate …

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an argo float is deployed into the ocean

Global warming of oceans equivalent to an atomic bomb per second

Seas absorb 90% of climate change’s energy as new research reveals vast heating over past 150 years — Global warming has heated the oceans by the equivalent of one atomic bomb explosion per second for the past 150 years, according to analysis of new research. More than 90% of the heat trapped by humanity’s greenhouse …

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bleached coral in guam in 2017

There’s one key takeaway from last week’s IPCC report

Cut carbon pollution as much as possible, as fast as possible — The Paris climate agreement set a target of no more than 2°C global warming above pre-industrial temperatures, but also an aspirational target of no more than 1.5°C. That’s because many participating countries – especially island nations particularly vulnerable to sea level rise – …

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nasa satellite photo

Pollution is slowing the melting of Arctic sea ice, for now

Human carbon pollution is melting the Arctic, but aerosol pollution is slowing it down — The Arctic is one of the “canaries in the coal mine” for climate change. Long ago, scientists predicted it would warm quicker than other parts of the planet, and they were right. Currently, the Arctic is among the fastest-warming places …

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north atlantic ocean

Slowdown of Atlantic conveyor belt could trigger ‘two decades’ of rapid global warming

A slowdown in the Atlantic Ocean current bringing warm water up to Europe from the tropics could trigger “a period of rapid global surface warming”, a new study suggests — The research, published in Nature, says that a recent weakening of the “Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation” (AMOC) is coming to an end, but will stay …

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waterfront condo buildings, florida

Rising ocean waters from global warming could cost trillions of dollars

We’ll need to mitigate and adapt to global warming to avoid massive costs from sea level rise — Ocean waters are rising because of global warming. They are rising for two reasons. First, and perhaps most obvious, ice is melting. There is a tremendous amount of ice locked away in Greenland, Antarctica, and in glaciers. …

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